Tag archives for:

Energy

Blog Post

What You Need to Know About Power Usage Effectiveness

At one time, data center efficiency was a method to measure energy consumption to which many data centers didn’t pay attention. Now, however, as nearly every business has an online component, and, in turn, a data center, data centers need to pay attention. The standard use metric is Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE). Here, we’ll answer some of your questions about PUE and how it can improve the efficiency of your data center.

Read More

Blog Post

Four Data Center Trends to Look out for in 2017

In data center management, it’s always a good idea to keep your eyes open to new, promising, and efficient industry trends. In 2016, data centers started adopting trends like scalability and automation in large numbers. 2017 will also bring its own new trends. Here, we’ll talk about four trends that we think will become commonplace in the data center in 2017 and beyond. Read More

Blog Post

Data Centers and Alternative Energy Sources

Data Centers and Alternative Energy Sources

Data centers in the United States consumed 70 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity in 2014 — an estimated 2 percent of the country’s total energy consumption. While the energy consumption growth of data centers has slowed in recent years thanks to efficiency improvements — 4 percent since 2010 compared to 90 percent between 2000 and 2005 — the industry is still a major energy consumer. To combat these high levels of energy use, companies such as Google and Microsoft are making the jump to transfer their operations to run with more renewable energy.

Here are three innovative types of renewable energy sources to consider for your data center — and even if they’re out of reach for now, hopefully they can provide some inspiration for the future.

Read More

Blog Post

Unconventional Data Centers

Innovative thinkers are constantly thinking of creative ways to save space and money by relocating their data centers – some that you certainly would not expect. One of the biggest reasons to choose an unconventional center is because of their environmentally friendly methods for cooling or redistributing server heat.

Here, we’ll talk about five of the most clever places where data centers have been built or are in the midst of being constructed. Read More

Blog Post

Three Ways Your Data Center Can Save Energy

With environmental concerns on the rise, it’s more important than ever for data centers to run efficiently. From smart watches to smart cars, data centers are at the forefront of technology, and our dependence on them is only expected to grow. In the U.S. alone, industry experts predict the data center construction market will grow at a CAGR of 4.38% between 2016 and 2020. As we face more and more pressure to keep operations green, it’s critical that data centers keep their carbon footprint to a minimum. Here are some things to consider as you create a more efficient data center. Read More

Blog Post

The Evolution of Data Centers from Energy Consumers to Energy Savers

Data centers are changing rapidly, and, as they become reliant on environmentally-friendly practices, there will be some winners and losers. Winners will be data centers that create energy-efficient infrastructures that combine software, construction, and utility in an eco-friendly and cost-effective way. Losers will be data centers that rely on diesel generators and traditional power generation.

Why will active energy players be more effective in the years to come? Here are three reasons this kind of power generation will save you money — and can be feasible for your data center.

Read More

Blog Post

One Person’s Trash is Another’s Treasure: Reusing Heat Energy in the Data Center

The expression “there’s gold in them hills” can be applied to data centers in an unexpected area: the heat energy the infrastructure produces. Excessive heat is generally considered a bad thing for a data center’s hardware, so it’s typical to build server racks with comprehensive cooling functionality. In most cases, the heat gets released outside in one way or another, but that heat could be used to provide energy for other purposes and reduce the overhead cost of operation. According to Data Center Knowledge, data centers end up releasing upwards of 98 percent of utilized electricity as low-grade heat energy. Read More

Blog Post

Zombies Could Be Lurking in Your Data Center: Get Rid of Them

Chances are your data center could save a small fortune in electrical bills and plug some substantial security holes by powering down unused server hardware. As of the end of 2015, there were 42.8 million physical servers in the world: about a third of these servers, or 12.8 million, were on but not actually doing work. A zombie server, also referred to as a comatose server, is a physical server that’s drawing electrical current while not being used. Servers become zombies when a new server takes over its role and it’s not repurposed or decommissioned. Some servers are unused because they’re running applications no one is using. According to TSOLogic, many servers stay running because management is nervous there could be problems by powering down the systems. Read More

Blog Post

Software Defined Data Centers: Moving Towards a Brighter Future

Companies that have not switched to a software defined data center model are missing out, maximizing existing infrastructure while throwing away money on upkeep costs. It’s time to move to a more efficient way of managing web applications and long-term storage. Modern computing requires more server power than ever: fortunately, server technology can handle more work than ever. Software defined data centers address the need for more power while being more economical in the process. Read More

Blog Post

Energy Star 3.0 Server Spec to Examine New Tech Trends

It’s no secret that data centers are one of the biggest electricity consumers in the world. According to the Natural Resources Defense Council, American businesses use about 91 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity to power data centers for an overall cost of $13 billion. According to an APC whitepaper, electricity makes up about 20 percent of server rack lifetime cost of ownership. New technological developments like Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) and general-purpose Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) have not only changed how quickly servers can operate, but have also made them more efficient. According to ComputerWorld, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencies is giving the new technology attention in the upcoming server Energy Star 3.0 specification to help businesses purchase and implement server infrastructure that keeps the electric bill down. The new specification may take a few years to complete. Read More

close